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Editor Manual

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Help / Editor Manual - 12 Dec 2013 17:37

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This editor manual gives detailed information on how the editor works. ProseEdit's editor edits the contents of a ProseEdit document - it has virtually no involvement with file handling. See the File Manager documentation for file operations including converting Prose documents to and from plain text format.

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1 Terminology

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2 Key Concepts

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2.1 Single Document Editing

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The editor predominantly only edits one document at a time. However the Scratch document [more (below)] makes it easy to transfer content from one document to another.

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2.2 Filename Extension

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ProseEdit documents have an extension of ‘.prose.html’. This ensures other apps treat them as HTML files (which they are), whilst identifying them from normal HTML files.

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2.3 Saved File Is Output

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ProseEdit doesn't have a private internal format which only it can display. Instead the saved file is the output document with all its formatting applied and is directly viewable by any browser. Hence, there is no ‘publishing’ phase, or format conversion required prior to sending someone a document. Indeed when you preview a ProseEdit document all you are really doing is viewing the current file in a browser.

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2.4 File Format Is HTML

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ProseEdit uses HTML as its file format. Its files are directly readable by browsers and the file format has been carefully constructed to be compatible with Word® as far as possible. You can open a prose.html file into Word® and all the content and virtually all the styling will be preserved. Indeed you can also access chunk journals and even chunk detail settings by making those styles non-hidden.

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ProseEdit has no ‘helper’ files nor any separate data storage - everything is embedded into the single .prose.html document. With the exception of linked in image files, the .prose.html file holds the complete content of the document.

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2.5 ProseEdit Is Not An HTML Editor

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ProseEdit is not an HTML editor. You cannot place HTML tags directly for example. Instead ProseEdit uses HTML internally to construct its documents. No knowledge of HTML is required to use ProseEdit.

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2.6 Documents Are Created From Templates

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All ProseEdit files are created from a template - which gives a starting point for the document including its settings. Any document can be used a template; there is no template format. To make a document available as a template, just copy/move its file into the ProseEdit / Resources / Templates folder. You can still edit the template document.

Templates are not live. The new document starts as a copy of the template. Subsequent changes to the template will not affect documents which have already been created using it.

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Any chunk in a template with a chunk ID of ‘template only’ will be removed when the document is created. Any chunk with a chunk ID of ‘template content only’ will have its content cleared.

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2.7 ProseEdit Is Not WYSIWYG

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ProseEdit is not WYSIWYG†, in fact it is deliberately not so. Instead it has a completely separate display for editing as opposed to previewing. This frees the editing environment from the constraints of the final document styling and size - which makes sense given the disparity in size between the display on an iPhone and a piece of A4. Hence, you won't find yourself endlessly panning and zooming to be able to see the content, or squinting to make out the text against a colourful background. When editing, the text is formatted to fit the screen at all times, using fonts you can choose for that purpose. The look of the saved document is controlled separately using styles - see below.

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The display during editing is described in detail in the Editor's What You Can See help.

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2.7.1 Editor Fonts

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You can change the fonts used to show the document while editing, from within the File Manager [how]. As described above, these fonts do not affect the output document, only your editing view, so you are free to select whatever's best for editing - based upon eye comfort, ease of positioning the cursor and how much information you want to get on the screen at once.

There are several separate font settings covering the various types of chunks [more], so you can ensure it's clear what is what while you edit your text.

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2.8 Formatting Is By Styles

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The formatting of the final document is controlled separately to the editor's display by document styles. These offer complete control over fonts, colours, borders, spacing and more.

The document styles are applied every time you save, and you can preview your document whenever you like [how].

Document styles are covered in detail in the styles section of this manual.

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2.9 Configuration Is Via Resource Documents

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Many aspects of the Editor's operation are configured by separate resource documents. These provide a means to adjust how the editor behaves to suit your preferences. Furthermore a document can specify the use of specific resources so the Editor's behaviour can be customised for certain tasks.

The document's resource settings do not affect the document content, but only what facilities are available during editing it. A recipient of the document doesn't need all its resource documents to view it, or edit it - but for example they might not have access to the same user edit menu buttons as you do while editing.

The Editor's resources are covered in detail in the resources section of this manual.

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3 Main Tools

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The editor allows in-situ editing of the document - tap on text to edit it. In addition to normal editing features, ProseEdit has a number of additional tools to augment its editing capability.

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3.1 Typing Recognition

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The Editor has a built-in recognition engine which monitors the text to the left of the cursor as you type and checks for matching stimuli in defined typing reactions.

Typing reactions can be used for a number of purposes:

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Unlike dictionary-based auto-correction, only the specific loaded reactions will occur - so you can always turn off any which cause annoyance.

The typing recogniser suppresses the same reaction from reoccurring in the same place, so you can simply delete the replacement and retype it to get what you want.

Typing reactions are utterly configurable. The reactions are loaded in from external typing reaction documents as specified by the document's resource setting [more]. The typing reaction documents themselves list the desired reactions and are edited in the main editor, like any other document [more].

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3.2 Edit Menu

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The Edit Menu provides text-level operations including spell checking, alternative word suggestion, text cut/copy and paste, text search and other user-defined functions [more].

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3.3 Chunk Operations

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ProseEdit has an extensive suite of tools which make it easy to perform larger edits, by working on ‘chunks’ rather than just text.
[more on chunks]
[chunk operations]

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3.4 Scratch

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Scratch is an entire document which is owned by the editor. It works like a clipboard for chunks, with the advantage you can edit Scratch just like any other document. Scratch is saved upon 〔Done〕, but not at other times. It has an edit history, but no means to recall previous versions.

Scratch is shown with a grey background [illustration], so it's always clear that you are not editing the main document.

You can:

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Use Scratch:

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Scratch is stored at Resources / Scratch. You cannot edit the file directly. However you can delete it, if somehow it has become corrupted and is preventing a successful startup (I've yet to need to do this).

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3.5 Document Index

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The Document Index provides a way to directly jump to content of interest, and find and extract matching content [more].

Toolbar Page 1: 〔/Read\〕 〔Index〕

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3.6 Document Preview

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The Document Preview shows the document as rendered by a browser, with all its formatting applied [more].

Toolbar Page 1: 〔/Read\〕 〔Preview〕

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4 Chunks

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Key to ProseEdit's editing power is the notion of a chunk. Rather than a document being a long stream of words, in ProseEdit a document is a list of ‘chunks’ of text. ProseEdit integrates the editing of chunks so it acts as one unified whole for normal text editing, but you can switch to selecting and working with entire chunks at the swipe of the toolbar. This makes it far easier to perform the sort of larger scale content reorganisation which is so tedious with text-based cut-and-paste alone.

How you split a document into chunks is up to you. I normally find using a chunk per normal paragraph or a couple small paragraphs works well.

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There is no specific limit to how much text you can put into a chunk. When it gets 'too long' (= a couple of screenfuls for text chunks), the chunk switches to scrolling independently of the document and shows ‘+++’ at the bottom. This clipping does not affect the saved document.

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If you regularly hit the chunk height limit and find the chunk scrolling is annoying, you might want to consider using smaller joined chunks instead, or perhaps a smaller font for editing.

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4.1 Tabs

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Every chunk can be tabbed [how], like applying a coloured tab to a page of interest. Tabs are visible in the final output.

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Tabbed chunks also include an anchor in the saved document, in the manner of chunkIDs [more]. The format is #nn (tabbed), where nn is the index of the chunk in the document.

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You can:

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4.2 Journals

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Most chunks have a journal, which allows you to add notes. Journals are saved with the document, but are normally invisible. You can see the journals in Word® by making the ‘journals’ style non-hidden (or tapping Word's ¶ button).

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Journals are particularly useful for markup chunks. You could record why an idea was rejected, or track where you got to with a task. Markup chunks also automatically log changes in their journal. So you can tell when a note was made, or a task abandoned for example.

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You can edit a chunk's journal by accessing its details [how].

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4.3 Chunk IDs

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A chunk ID is a reference name for that particular chunk. When saved, the chunk ID is embedded in the output HTML as an anchor id. This means other HTML files can link to that place in your document. Within a ProseEdit document, a chunk ID can be used as the target of either an inline link or a chunk link.

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Chunk IDs are listed in the Document Preview's index , where they provide a means of jumping to content.

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Section and table chunks automatically include an anchor id based upon their heading and numbering, which you can also link to. However, as their text depends upon automatic numbering, it's more robust to link to chunk IDs.

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You can edit a chunk's chunk ID by accessing its details [how]

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Chunk IDs are restricted to plain ASCII† as required by the HTML specification, but are otherwise included as given. Chunk IDs are case sensitive and can include spaces. Avoid repeating the same chunk ID within a document - browsers will always jump to the first instance. The Preview's index highlights repeated chunk IDs, to help identify this issue.

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You can find chunks with a specific Chunk ID, or list all chunks with any chunk ID set by using the id: qualifier in the Document Index's content search.

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4.4 Chunk Links

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Certain chunk types can have a chunk link specified in their details [more]. When set this makes the entire chunk act as a hotspot - tapping on it in the browser will follow the given link.

The link address is not visible in the output. By default the text of links with a chunk link set have a blue highlight, but this can be overruled by the styles set for the chunk.

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The link address works in the same way as for inline links where the link is included in the midst of the chunk's visible text [more].

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5 Chunk Types

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ProseEdit provides a range of chunk types to extend the concept of a ‘chunk of text’ to encompass all the content a real document should have.

The type of chunk is determined when the chunk is created, but can be ‘changed’ later.

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5.1 Text Chunks

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Text chunks are the workhorse of ProseEdit. They hold paragraphs of normal text.

Text chunks can be set to be either Title, Text or Code. Each of the types has its own font for clarity in the editor. In addition they have different handling of paragraphs. They also use separate default styles.

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Title text is used for titles.

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Text is used for normal text, the basic prose of the document.

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Code text is used for including computer listings or poetry

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The text can be set to left, centre or right justified (flush justification is possible via styles). This is shown in the editor view and also affects the saved document.
The text can be made bold, italics or both, again this is visible in the editor

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Text chunks can have a prompt set, which shows when the chunk is empty. This is handy for templates and forms. The prompt does not appear in the saved document.

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5.1.1 Line Breaks And Paragraphs

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Each text chunk starts a new paragraph in the output file. Within each chunk, a single return gives a line break, and a double return starts a new paragraph. How you arrange paragraphs within chunks makes no difference to the output - you can group them how you like.

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To illustrate how this works, the following example has 2 text chunks each with a coloured border set.

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This is the first chunk of text. Every chunk starts a new paragraph.

This is another paragraph within the first chunk.

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This is the second chunk of text. This chunk has a broken line.
This is the broken line - as you can see the line is still part of the same paragraph.

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Text chunks set to code behave differently; every return counts as a new paragraph.

This allows long lines to wrap with an indent, which is useful for code listings (and poetry).

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Text chunks set to Title don't have paragraphs.

Every return counts as a line break.

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5.1.2 Styles

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There is a separate default style for each type of text chunk, so text, code and title chunks can be formatted separately. Text chunks (of all types) can also be set to use a user style in place of the default style. The style can be further overridden with specific style settings.

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The styles are applied to every paragraph within the chunk. There is no overall chunk style (primarily for compatibility with Word).

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5.2 Part Chunks

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A part chunk starts a new part of the document. It includes a heading with a manual number and can optionally restart the section numbering and change the formatting of section numbers for all sections which follow it.

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Both the number and heading text can be hidden in the final document, in which case they are effectively comments visible only while editing.

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Parts include an automatically generated anchor name in the output file. This includes the part's number and heading text. An additional anchor name can also be included by setting the part chunk's chunk ID.

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5.2.1 Numbering

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Parts thenselves are manually numbered. Although referred to as a ‘number’ it can be any text. Document settings control whether the number is included in the final document and if so whether it's inline with the heading text or on its own line [more].

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Each part can specify the numbering format for following section chunks.

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Part chunks provides the means to change the section numbering as required for appendices, or a preamble part consisting of say a foreword and a preface. They can also opt to allow the section numbering to continue, allowing for say parts I, II and III of a book with chapter numbers which run on rather than restarting at 1 each time.

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5.2.2 Styles

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There are 3 styles associated with parts, an overall style, which is applied around both the number and the heading, and a separate style for each of the number and the heading [more].

Note that while the overall style is imported into Word, it is not available as a style within it.

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5.3 Section Chunks

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A section chunk starts a new section in the document. Sections are automatically numbered, so only the heading text needs to be entered. There are 5 levels of sections with level 1 being the top level, down to level 5 being a sub-sub-sub-subsection.

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Sections include an automatically generated anchor name in the output file. This includes the section's number - so it is good for the Document Preview's index, but not robust for linking to. A fixed anchor name can also be included by setting the section chunk's chunk ID.

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5.3.1 Section Numbering

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Sections are numbered automatically, following the formatting defined in a preceding part chunk or the document's section numbering settings [more] for sections before the first part chunk. The numbering format is configured separately for every section level.

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The numbering settings provide extensive control over the numbering including any prefix and suffix text so you can have ‘Chapter 1’, ‘Chapter 2’,… or ‘Section 1’, ‘§1.1’, ‘§1.2’, ‘Section 2’, …

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The formatting settings can also specify whether the number and heading text should be included together on the same line, or separately with the heading text on its own line. This affects both the final document and a plain text export.

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A document setting specifies the number of the first section of the document [more], and the numbering can also be restarted by any part chunk.

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5.3.2 Styles

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The formatting of sections is entirely controlled by document styles - there are no user styles. The document style settings [more] are extensive, allowing different styles for both the number and heading of every level of section. There are also styles which affect all sections, so your can set common aspects there and only have to use all the level styles for any differences required for specific section levels. Section chunks can have style overrides if required for example to adjust the spacing before a specific heading.

Each Section heading is considered to be just one paragraph, regardless of its text content.

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5.4 Item Chunks

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An item chunk consists of a bullet or number and its content text. Several items together make a list.

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Example Lists

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  • This is an item chunk

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  • And so is this

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  • This the third item

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  1. This is an item chunk

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  3. And so is this

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  5. This the third item

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Line breaks in item chunks behave like normal text chunks: one return starts a new line, 2 returns start a new paragraph, within the same item. There is no specific limit to how long an item can be.

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5.4.1 Numbering

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Items can have bullets or numbers. The numbering is automatically generated. There are 5 levels of indent available. Items of each level of indent are numbered separately, and the formatting of each level can be set independently.

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  1. Level 1 item

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    2. First level 2 item

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    4. Second level 2 item

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  2. Second level 1 item

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You can inset items by adjusting their level in their details [how].

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The List Format document setting [more] controls the default numbering. In addition any item can potentially override the document's setting, but only the first item at each level can do so. Subsequent items simply follow the new format [more].

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The number/bullet for any item can be suppressed by setting its format to 〔None〕. This makes it act like a continuation of the previous item, so it doesn't take the first paragraph highlight, or affect the numbering. You can of course join the items chunks together, so they select and swap like they were one item.

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  1. Item

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    Continuation of first item

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  3. Second item

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Markup chunks also do not interrupt list numbering.

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5.4.2 Styles

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Items have similar styles as for text chunks. In addition the default styles allow for a highlight style on the first paragraph of each item. This is applied on top of the normal item style, making it easy to emphasize the main item text. Continuation items are considered not to have a first paragraph.

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There is also an overall list style which encompasses all the items in a list. This can be used to separate lists from the body text, or give the list a box, etc.

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The default styles apply to all items in the document. Each item can also use a user style or have its own style overrides, both of which are applied to every paragraph in the item's text.

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5.5 Figure Chunks

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Figure chunks allow the inclusion of images as figures. Each figure chunk specifies the file to use for its content. Images are always linked in from external files, in the manner of HTML documents - there is no way to embed an image within the document.

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Though intended for the inclusion of images, the figure content can be a wide range of file types, even another ProseEdit document.

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Every figure chunk is numbered as part of a caption series. Each figure declares which caption series it is part of, and provides its own heading text. The document settings control how each caption series behaves.

If the figure is set to have a caption of ‘None’, the figure's text will not included in the document - so can be used as a comment.

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There is no requirement for figure chunks to use ‘figure’ captions.

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5.5.1 Styles

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There are a number of default styles used for figure chunks [more]. These give formatting control over figure chunks as a whole, their content and their captions. The default styles apply to all figure chunks.

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Each figure chunk also has a style override which is applied to its content, allowing adjustments as required for that specific image.

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5.6 Table, Column, Row And Cell Chunks

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The various table chunks form a structure which holds normal chunks as a payload. Any chunk type can be used within a cell, including another table - you can have nested tables. There are no limits to the size of the table.

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5.6.1 Table Start Chunks

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A table start chunk declares the start of a table and holds the caption and the settings for that table.

When you insert a new table, ProseEdit creates a matching pair of start and end chunks, together with the column, rows and cell chunks required to form the size of table requested.

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The table can be set to be central (to the page), or shifted to the left or right. If on the left or right, the table can specify whether the next chunk after the table should start ‘Beside’ the table or ‘Below’ the table. Choosing ‘Beside’ will result in the following content flowing around the table.

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5.6.1.1 Heading Rows And Columns

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The table start chunk can specify how many rows and columns in this table are headings, or it can turn off heading rows and columns completely. There are separate default styles for heading rows and columns which allow them to be highlighted as required. The highlight for heading columns is split over 2 styles to overcome the limitations of column styles in CSS. Settings in ‘Header Column Highlight’ under column styles are applied to the column as a whole. These are lower priority than rows, and are very restricted. Settings in ‘In Header Column Highlight’ under cell styles are applied to each cell independently and are not subject to the same restrictions. Styles set here will take priority over row settings though.

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The styles are termed ‘highlights’ as they are applied on top of the basic style settings. There is no requirement for them to be a mere highlight though - any combination of style elements can be applied to them.

Table— cph=73— clh=64— style=2— series=Table— title=Header Rows And Column Example— header-rows=1— header-cols=1—

TableColumn— cph=44— clh=44—

TableColumn— cph=44— clh=44—

TableColumn— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

Table 5.1 Header Rows And Column Example

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Person

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Job

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Hobby

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Fred

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Butcher

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Walking

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Dave

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Baker

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Running

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Mick

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Candlestick maker

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Swimming

TableEnd— cph=50— clh=50—

Section— cph=42— clh=42— level=4—

5.6.1.2 Row Striping

Text— cph=215— clh=139—

ProseEdit supports automatic row striping, where the table is given bands to make it easier to read. The table start chunk specifies the width of row striping for that table, or can be set to ‘None’ to suppress row striping. Rows after any header rows are then considered to be part of stripes each of the specified width. There are separate highlight styles for ‘odd’ and ‘even’ stripes which are applied to alternate stripes working down the table.

Text— cph=120— clh=82—

The styles are termed ‘highlights’ as they are applied on top of the basic style settings. There is no requirement for them to be a mere highlight though - any combination of style elements can be applied to them.

Table— cph=73— clh=64— style=2— series=Table— title=Row Striping Example— header-rows=1— row-stripe=1—

TableColumn— cph=44— clh=44—

TableColumn— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

Table 5.2 Row Striping Example

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Time

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Cars Passing

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

9:00—9:59

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

23

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

10:00—10:59

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

10

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

11:00— 11:59

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

4

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

12:00—12:59

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

12

TableEnd— cph=50— clh=50—

Text— cph=101— clh=63—

The striping highlights are applied to each the row as the default style for that row. Any row chunk could overrule them via its style override. The same applies to included cells.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— level=4—

5.6.1.3 Caption

Text— cph=101— clh=82—

The table start chunk holds the caption for this table. The chunk itself provides the heading text, with the numbering generated for the chunk's specified caption series.

Text— cph=63— clh=44—

Table captions are limited to being above or below the table only.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— level=4—

5.6.1.4 Styles

Text— cph=158— clh=101—

There is a default style with applies to tables as a whole. The table start chunk has an override to provide settings for just this table. Style settings apply to all chunks included in the table, though can be overruled by columns, rows, and cells. Setting a border on the table chunk will result in a border around the table as a whole.

Text— cph=177— clh=101—

There are also default styles governing the appearance of table captions. There is an overall style which applies to the caption as a whole, and separate styles for the number and heading text portions of the caption. There are no overrides for table caption styles - all table captions with be the same throughout the document.

Text— cph=63— clh=44—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Section— cph=42— clh=42— level=3—

5.6.2 Table End Chunks

Text— cph=82— clh=63—

Table end chunks declare the end of a table. They are normally created as part of inserting a table. Table end chunks have no settings.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— level=3—

5.6.3 Column Chunks

Text— cph=111— clh=77—

Column chunks are actually optional - the size of the table is deduced form the arrangement of the cells it contains. Nevertheless column chunks remain useful in order to specify any formatting and show the intended size of the table.

Text— cph=128— clh=77—

Column chunks have a comment setting. If set, the comment appears in the chunk when editing. It is not visible in the saved document. The comment can be used to remind of the significance of this column's data, or perhaps the formatting applied to this column.


(null)
20/03/2013 10:47 - Changed to text

Text— cph=59— clh=42—

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- column chunk styles— level=4—

5.6.3.1 Styles

Text— cph=94— clh=59—

There are 2 separate styles associated with column chunks. This is due to a limitation in CSS itself, where the styling of columns themselves are limited to:

    Item— cph=42— clh=42— join=Y— level=1— format=12—

  • Width

  • Item— cph=42— clh=42— join=Y— level=1— format=12—

  • Border

  • Item— cph=42— clh=42— join=Y— level=1— format=12—

  • Background colour

  • Item— cph=42— clh=42— level=1— format=12—

  • Visibility

Text— cph=215— clh=120—

Other style elements are ignored, so for example you cannot set the text colour for chunks within a column, or make them have bold text. To overcome the limitation, ProseEdit also has a style for the cells included within the column. This is applied to the cells directly, so is not subject to the same restrictions. However, as it is applied to the cells this means it takes priority over any row styling which might not always be desirable.

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Section— cph=42— clh=42— level=3—

5.6.4 Row Chunks

Text— cph=139— clh=101—

A row chunk declares the beginning of the next row of the table.

Like column chunks, row chunk can have a comment set. Again this comment is purely an aid during editing.

Text— cph=63— clh=44—

When you insert a new row, the correct number of cells are also provided.

Text— cph=120— clh=82—

If there is a problem with the table layout (for example this row hasn't got any cells within it) the chunk will be highlighted in magenta. In this case a detailed warning will be available in the row chunk's details.

Text— cph=120— clh=82—

Row chunks have alignment settings for their contents which provide a shortcut over using style settings for the same purpose. Note that overspecifying cell text alignment can result in all the alignment settings being ignored.

Text— cph=63— clh=44—

Section— cph=42— clh=42— level=4—

5.6.4.1 Styles

Text— cph=215— clh=139—

A row chunk inherits its styling from the document and the table. Styles set in a row take priority over the basic column chunk styles, but not over their setting for ‘included cells’.

There is a default style for rows in general. Each row chunk can also apply specific style overrides. Styles set within a row apply to all the chunks (both cells and other chunks) contained within it.

Text— cph=82— clh=63—

The styling of the row can be further changed by row heading and striping highlights, if these are being used.

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Section— cph=42— clh=42— level=3—

5.6.5 Cell Chunks

Text— cph=120— clh=82—

A cell chunk declares the start of a new cell. All following chunks will be considered to be within that cell, other than a row chunk or another cell chunk, which will start a new row or cell respectively.

Text— cph=120— clh=82—

A cell chunk specifies how large it is via row size and column size settings. These settings indicate how many rows and columns this single cell spans. The cell chunk icon indicates the cell's position in the table and its size.

Text— cph=120— clh=82—

If there is a problem with the table layout (for example this cell overlaps with another cell) the chunk will be highlighted in magenta. In this case a detailed warning will be available in the cell's details.

Text— cph=63— clh=44—

Section— cph=42— clh=42— level=4—

5.6.5.1 Styles

Text— cph=177— clh=120—

A cell chunk is at bottom of a long tree in terms of styles. It inherits its styling from the document, the table, its column and its row.

There is a default style for cells in general. Each cell chunk can also apply specific style overrides. Styles set within a cell apply to all the chunks contained within it.

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Section— cph=42— clh=42— level=2—

5.7 Markup Chunks

Text— cph=101— clh=63—

Markup chunks are intended to let you write notes to yourself to track the development of your document, without any risk of them getting overlooked in the final version.

Text— cph=101— clh=63—

Markup chunks are included in the saved document, and are visible. A simple border format is used instead of the icons seen while editing so there is no need for image files.

Text— cph=101— clh=63—

All markup chunks have a journal - where you can write up notes. Markup chunks also record key events, like an idea being rejected, in their journal.

Text— cph=120— clh=82—

The Document Index has switches to show each type, and you can restrict content searches to look in just markup chunks (or just in tasks, ideas or notes).

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

The count report also gives details of them.

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

There are 3 types of markup chunks.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— level=3—

5.7.1 Task Chunks

Text— cph=63— clh=44—

Task chunks let you flag up a task and track its progress.

Task— cph=58— clh=58— progress=0— status=0—

Task
0%

This is an unstarted task


05/01/2013 16:51 - Task created

Task— cph=58— clh=58— progress=6— status=0—

Task
25%

This task is just underway


05/01/2013 16:47 - Task created

Task— cph=58— clh=58— progress=12— status=0—

Task
50%

This task is half way


05/01/2013 16:47 - Task created
05/01/2013 16:48 - Task set to 50%

Task— cph=58— clh=58— progress=18— status=0—

Task
75%

This task is nearly done



05/01/2013 16:48 - Task set to 75%

Task— cph=58— clh=58— progress=24— status=0—

Task
DONE

This task is complete


05/01/2013 16:44 - Task created
05/01/2013 16:45 - Task DONE

Task— cph=71— clh=58— progress=0— status=1—

Task
(deferred)

This task has been deferred for the time being


05/01/2013 16:45 - Task abandoned
19/03/2013 15:46 - Task deferred

Task— cph=58— clh=58— progress=0— status=2—

Task
(abandoned)

This task was abandoned


05/01/2013 16:45 - Task created
05/01/2013 16:45 - Task abandoned

Text— cph=82— clh=63—

When editing, task chunks are shown with an icon which shows their status [illustration].

Text— cph=63— clh=44—

Section— cph=42— clh=42— level=3—

5.7.2 Idea Chunks

Text— cph=63— clh=63—

You can use idea chunks to record an idea, which can be subsequently accepted or rejected.

Idea— cph=58— clh=58— status=0—

Idea
open

This is an idea


05/01/2013 16:54 - Idea logged

Idea— cph=58— clh=58— status=2—

Idea
rejected

This idea was rejected


05/01/2013 16:55 - Idea logged
05/01/2013 16:56 - Rejected

Idea— cph=58— clh=58— status=1—

Idea
accepted

This idea has been accepted


05/01/2013 16:56 - Idea logged
05/01/2013 16:56 - Accepted

Text— cph=82— clh=63—

When editing, idea chunks are shown with an icon which shows their status [illustration].

Text— cph=63— clh=44—

Section— cph=42— clh=42— level=3—

5.7.3 Note Chunks

Text— cph=82— clh=63—

Notes chunks are for when you've spotted something, but haven't decided what to do about it.

Note— cph=58— clh=58— type=0—

Comment

This is just a comment


05/01/2013 17:02 - Note added

Note— cph=58— clh=58— type=1—

Query

This is a query


05/01/2013 17:03 - Note added
05/01/2013 17:04 - Marked as a query

Note— cph=58— clh=58— type=2—

ISSUE

This highlights an issue


05/01/2013 17:04 - Marked as an issue

Text— cph=82— clh=63—

When editing, note chunks are shown with an icon which shows their status [illustration].

Text— cph=63— clh=44—

Section— cph=42— clh=42— level=3—

5.7.4 Styles

Text— cph=63— clh=44—

Markup chunks have their own default style, so they can be made to stand out.

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Section— cph=42— clh=42— level=2—

5.8 Special Chunks

Text— cph=120— clh=82—

Some of the resource files make use of special purpose chunks to facilitate their configuration. While they can be copied in to any document, they only make sense in their respective resource files.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- reaction chunks— level=3—

5.8.1 Reaction Chunks

TypingReaction— cph=62— clh=62— on=Y— anycase=Y— strict=N— wholeWord=Y— action=— copycase=Y—

abbr

abbreviation

WORDS

ANY CASE

AUTO CASE

Text— cph=101— clh=63—

A Reaction chunk specifies one particular reaction to typing in a typing reactions resource document [more].

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- button chunks— join=Y— level=3—

5.8.2 Button Chunks

EditMenuButton— cph=50— clh=50— join=Y— on=N—

Aa

OFF

Text— cph=82— clh=63—

Button chunks specify a button in the user portion of the Edit Menu [more].

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- pattern chunks— level=3—

5.8.3 Pattern Chunks

Pattern— cph=50— clh=50— on=N—

in☐a

OFF

Text— cph=82— clh=63—

Pattern chunks specify a matching pattern in text splitting rules [more].

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- captions— level=1—

6 Captions

Text— cph=196— clh=120—

Captions are the text and numbering which accompanies the heading of figures and tables. A ProseEdit document can define a number of caption series. Each caption series has its own settings and is numbered separately to all other series. This allows figure chunks to be used for a variety of purposes. In addition to the obvious figure 1, you can have photos, images, and even equations.

Text— cph=101— clh=63—

Furthermore, both figure and table chunks can use any caption - so you could include a table via an image in a figure chunk and set to use ‘table’ caption for example.

Text— cph=63— clh=44—

Section— cph=42— clh=42— level=2—

6.1 Numbering

Text— cph=120— clh=82—

Captions can either be numbered within each top level section (i.e. figures in section 3 would be fig 3-1, fig 3-2…), or numbered flatly across the whole document. Or they can be set not to have any numbering.

Text— cph=77— clh=59—

Captions have 2 levels, so you can have fig 1a, fig 1b etc. The level of each caption is set by the figure or table chunk.

Text— cph=77— clh=59—

The formatting of the numbering, including any prefixes, is a document setting and is set for each caption series separately.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— level=2—

6.2 Styles

Text— cph=59— clh=42—

There are a separate set of default styles for the captions of both tables and figures.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— level=1—

7 Text Content

Text— cph=42— clh=42—

The text within a chunk is edited in-situ.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— level=2—

7.1 Spaces

Text— cph=249— clh=163—

ProseEdit uses HTML as its output format, which might make those familiar with HTML assume that excess whitespace will be ignored. However ProseEdit formats all its text using CSS style element ‘white-space:pre-wrap’ by default which perserves spaces.

In short the document will show the spaces as typed be it:
one space, 2 spaces, 3 spaces, or more.

It also allows sentences to be spaced by 2 spaces in the final document.

Text— cph=82— clh=63—

To return to whitespace invariance, simply add the style element ‘white-space:normal’ to the default text style (and item style).

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- non-breaking spaces— join=Y— level=2—

7.2 Non-breaking Spaces

Text— cph=101— clh=63— join=Y—

A non-breaking space is a space which a browser cannot split a line at. If 2 words are joined by a non-breaking space, they will always be next to each other.

Text— cph=123— clh=85— join=Y—

In ProseEdit an undertie (i.e. ‿) is used to represent a non-breaking space. So G.‿Vines will appear as G. Vines in the final document, with no risk of the G. being left dangling at the end of a line.

Text— cph=180— clh=111— join=Y—

The default typing reactions include some reactions to make it easier to type an ‿. Firstly _ gives an undertie and secondly ‿_ gives a _ - so tap _ twice to get a _. If you want a series of underties, keep typing _ until you've got enough, then delete the final ‘_’ . These reactions could be changed to whatever would be more convenient for your specific needs.

Text— cph=59— clh=42—

If you need to show an undertie symbol, use ‘&undertie;’ in the editor.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— join=Y— level=2—

7.3 Quote Marks

Text— cph=266— clh=180—

ProseEdit doesn't have ‘smart’ quotes by default. Instead the default typing reactions offer ‘auto-closure’ where typing a quote mark gives you both halves and leaves the cursor in between them - see ‘How Do I Get Proper Speech Marks?’. User Edit Menu buttons can also wrap the selected text with the punctuation of your choice.

If you prefer smart quotes over auto-closure, download the Smart Quotes Typing Reactions on the ProseEdit website.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- sentence spacing— level=2—

7.4 Sentence Spacing

Text— cph=111— clh=77— join=Y—

ProseEdit is set up to include 2 spaces after the end of a sentence by default. This is implemented by a combination of default typing reactions and text splitting rules - and can changed to suit your preferences.

Text— cph=128— clh=77— join=Y—

The default typing reactions include reactions to insert 2 spaces after a full-stop, exclamation mark and question mark - see the Sentence Termination section.

Text— cph=111— clh=77—

The default text splitting rules will insert 2 spaces between sentences when merging chunks - see the Sentence Spacing section.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- inline links— join=Y— level=2—

7.5 Inline Links

Text— cph=94— clh=77— join=Y—

You can include a link to another document by including either \<link> or \<title = link> , where ‘link’ is the HTML web address and ‘title’ is the text you want to appear in the link.

Text— cph=101— clh=63—

Inline links are interpreted when the file is saved. They are active in the Preview, and any other browser provided they have access to the target files.

Table— cph=64— clh=64— style=2— series=— title=Inline Link Examples—

TableColumn— cph=44— clh=44—

TableColumn— cph=44— clh=44—

TableColumn— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Text of

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Gives

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=63— clh=44—

Wrap a web address in <….>, for it to be treated as a link.

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

\<www.google.co.uk>

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=63— clh=63—

Links can be given a different title
Note there must be a space before the =

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

\<Google = www.google.co.uk>

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

There must be no space after the <

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=59— clh=59—

\< link>
\< title = link>

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=59— clh=59—

< link>
< title = link>

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=59— clh=42—

Precede the text by \ to prevent it being treated like a link

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

\\<link>

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

\<link>

TableEnd— cph=50— clh=50—

Text— cph=139— clh=82—

There are separate styles for visited and unvisited link text giving freedom in their appearance [more]. These styles are applied on top of the styles settings for the chunk the link text is within.

Section— cph=60— clh=42— level=3—

7.5.1 Linking To ProseEdit Documents

Text— cph=120— clh=82—

The link portion of an inline link is an entirely standard HTML hyperlink, so can link to any file or website, anywhere. Here are some pointers to linking between ProseEdit documents:

    Item— cph=253— clh=139— level=1— format=12—

  • To link elsewhere in the same document, use \<title = #chunkID>, where chunkID is a unique Chunk ID setting for the chunk you want to jump to. So \<#- inline links> would link to the start of this section, but only because this section's chunk has its chunk ID set to '- inline links'. There is no requirement for the chunk ID to match the section heading (but the text is visible within the Preview's index listing).

  • Item— cph=196— clh=101— level=1— format=12—

  • To link to the beginning of another ProseEdit document in the same folder, you need \<title = document.prose.html>, where document is the name of the document - so \<Editor Manual.prose.html> would link to this file. Note you have to include the file's full extension, and the link is case sensitive.

  • Item— cph=120— clh=63— level=1— format=12—

  • To link to a specific chunk in an another document in the same folder combine the two ideas above, so \<title = document.prose.html#chunkID>.

  • Item— cph=104— clh=66— level=1— format=12—

  • To link to a document with a comment, the comment must be included in ‘{ }’, i.e. \<report \{comment}.prose.html>

  • Item— cph=335— clh=215— level=1— format=12—

  • To link to a document in a subfolder start the link with ./ - so \<title = ./subfolder/document.prose.html>.

    The ‘.’ represents the current folder, i.e. the folder this document is in. This is a relative link - which means the link will still work if all the files are moved or copied to somewhere else - provided all the files are present and they are in the same relative places.

    You can also use ‘..’ to represent the folder above the one holding this document. So \<..\Welcome.prose.html> would pull up the Welcome document, provided neither file was moved.

  • Item— cph=59— clh=42— level=1— format=12—

  • You can of course link to other file types and websites

Text— cph=111— clh=77—

Links to table rows, columns or cells only take you to the start of the table in the Preview. Links to the content chunks themselves to scroll directly to show the specific chunks when followed.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- fields— level=2—

7.6 Fields

Text— cph=146— clh=111—

ProseEdit supports simple in-text fields, which are system names which are replaced by their value at the time the document is saved.

Fields are only replaced if they are recognised - other text is transferred unchanged. Include a preceding ‘\’ to prevent recognition.

Table— cph=64— clh=64— style=2— series=— title=Known fields—

TableColumn— cph=44— clh=44— cell-style=vertical-align:top—

TableColumn— cph=44— clh=44— cell-style=vertical-align:top—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Text of

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44— style=1—

Gives

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

\{name}

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=63— clh=44— style=1—

This document's name, as visible under its info settings

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

\{folder}

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44— style=1—

The path listing of this document's folder

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

\{comment}

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=63— clh=63— style=1—

This document's comment, as visible under its info settings. This is derived from its filename.

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=101— clh=101—


\{date}
\{Date}
\{DATE}

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=177— clh=139— style=1—

The date of saving, in increasing levels of detail, e.g.:
12/12/2013
12 Dec 2013
12 December 2013

The exact formats depend on your device's region settings.

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=101— clh=101—


\{time}
\{Time}
\{TIME}

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=177— clh=139— style=1—

The time of saving, in increasing levels of detail, e.g.:
17:37
17:37:41
17:37:41 GMT

The exact formats depend on your device's region settings.

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=47— clh=47—

\{other text}

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=63— clh=63— style=1—

\{other text}
- not recognised as a field.

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

\\{name}

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=82— clh=63— style=1—

\{name}
- recognition suppressed, so transferred literally.

TableEnd— cph=50— clh=50—

Text— cph=82— clh=63—

Obviously, fields are only updated when ProseEdit saves the document, not when they are copied or edited by other means.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- inline emphasis— level=2—

7.7 Inline Emphasis

Text— cph=234— clh=158—

Most of ProseEdit's styles work on chunks, however you can emphasize a portion of text using * either side of it. For the \*'s to be interpreted as inline emphasis they have to next to the start and end words with no spaces. Put a \ in front of the * to suppress inline emphasis should you need to type \*word.

Inline emphasis cannot cross a chunk boundary - emphasize the two portions of text separately, or structure the chunks differently.

Table— cph=64— clh=64— style=2— series=— title=Emphasis examples—

TableColumn— cph=44— clh=44—

TableColumn— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Text of

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Gives

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=82— clh=82—

A \*bold word\* or two

There are 2 r's in co\*rr\*ect

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=82— clh=82—

A bold word or two

There are 2 r's in correct

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=82— clh=82—

A * with spaces is ignored

Use \\*bold\\* to get \*bold\*

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=82— clh=82—

A * with spaces is ignored

Use \*bold\* to get bold

TableEnd— cph=50— clh=50—

Text— cph=139— clh=82—

The actual styling used is set under ‘Document:Emphasis (inline)’ in the Style Settings [more]. It can be virtually anything, but the same setting applies throughout the document.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— join=Y— level=2—

7.8 Spell Checking

Text— cph=158— clh=101— join=Y—

ProseEdit offers an on-the-spot spell-check. Select any text and the Edit Menu will indicate whether it's spelt correctly, and give corrections/alternatives based upon the internal dictionary and words in the document's lexicons.

Text— cph=120— clh=82—

The Editor can also be set to use the iPhone's normal underlining of mistyped words if desired. This is set in the File Manager [how].

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- chunk operations— level=1—

8 Chunk Operations

Text— cph=234— clh=139—

ProseEdit provides an extensive suite of operations which can be performed on chunks. This manual concentrates on the operations which require further explanation of how they work and what they do. Review the Editor's ‘What You Can Do’ documentation for a complete listing of what operations are available on selected chunks and on a swiped chunk.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- the selection— level=2—

8.1 The Selection

Text— cph=82— clh=63—

The selection forms the starting point for chunk-level operations, like moving, copying and splitting.

Text— cph=111— clh=77—

You select chunks by tapping in the margins when they are visible (toolbar pages 2 and 3). The extent of the margins is shown by thin dark blue vertical lines [illustration].

Text— cph=94— clh=59—

You can select a range of chunks. There can only be one selected range in the document. The selection is saved with the document, but is not visible in the final output.

Text— cph=94— clh=59—

There is no equivalent of shift-click or ctrl-click to change the selection. Instead the selection grows or shrinks based upon where you've tapped.

Text— cph=77— clh=59—

For the interested here are the actual rules used by the selection. Knowing these can help you achieve what you want with fewer taps.

    Item— cph=77— clh=59— level=1— format=12—

  • If you tap outside the selection, the nearest end will grow to include where you've tapped, and any joined chunks.

  • Item— cph=77— clh=59— level=1— format=12—

  • If you tap inside the selection the oldest end will shrink back to where you've tapped.

  • Item— cph=63— clh=44— level=1— format=12—

  • If you tap on the only selected chunk, the selection is dismissed.

  • Item— cph=158— clh=82— level=1— format=12—

  • If you tap in the dark green border before or after the document the selection will be extended to include that end of the document, or the entire document will be selected if there is no selection. Tap again to clear the selection.

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

When there is no selection:

    Item— cph=63— clh=44— level=1— format=12—

  • Selecting a section chunk will select all of its included chunks.

  • Item— cph=63— clh=44— level=1— format=12—

  • Selecting an item chunk will select it and any continuation chunks after it.

  • Item— cph=63— clh=44— level=1— format=12—

  • Selecting a table start or end chunk will select the whole table.

  • Item— cph=63— clh=44— level=1— format=12—

  • Selecting a row chunk will select it and all its included cells and chunks.

  • Item— cph=63— clh=44— level=1— format=12—

  • Selecting a cell chunk will select it and all included chunks.

Text— cph=101— clh=63—

The selection handling rules seem complicated but in practice it is fairly natural to use. Tapping beyond the selection makes it grow, tapping inside makes it shrink. In general,


(null)
21/03/2013 16:02 - Changed to text

    Item— cph=63— clh=44— join=Y— level=1— format=2—

  1. Double tap in a margin to select just this chunk

  2. Item— cph=82— clh=44— level=1— format=12—

  3. Tap in the margin of the chunk at the other end of the range you want selected.

Text— cph=82— clh=63—

If in doubt keep tapping in the margin of the same chunk until just it is selected, and tap again to have no chunks selected.


(null)
21/03/2013 16:02 - Changed to text

Section— cph=42— clh=42— level=2—

8.2 Move And Copy

Text— cph=82— clh=63—

You can move or copy the chunks in the selection [how].

Text— cph=182— clh=125—

Note that〔Copy〕inserts a copy of the selection at the new location; it does not copy them to an internal buffer as would be the case for a copy and paste. If you want to duplicate the selection, just copy it again - the new chunks are left selected to facilitate this. Alternatively copy the chunks to Scratch and copy them back into this document (or other documents).

Text— cph=177— clh=101—

You can't use the Document Index to navigate during a Move or Copy. However, you can instigate a Move or Copy without the selection being visible. This allows you to select some chunks, navigate elsewhere via the index, and then Move/Copy the selection to where you are now.

Text— cph=87— clh=68—

Moving and Copying can be limited to affect only the tabbed chunks within the selection, by tapping 〔All / Tabbed〕.

Text— cph=163— clh=106—

Move and Copy can also use Scratch as the destination. Tap〔Document / Scratch〕on the Move/Copy toolbar to view Scratch and tap a destination to put the chunks there. If Scratch currently has a selection it'll be shown greyed. Moving/copying from Scratch works in exactly the same way, but you need to start in Scratch.

Text— cph=111— clh=77—

Both the Document and Scratch will record any changes due the transfer of chunks in their edit history. However, undoing the move in the Document doesn't also undo the move in Scratch, and vice-versa.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- folding chunks— level=2—

8.3 Folding Chunks

Text— cph=146— clh=94—

A chunk can be folded to save screen space [how]. When folded a chunk only shows the first couple of lines of its content in the editor. Folding doesn't affect the final output, but the chunk's folded state is remembered when the document is saved.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- joining chunks— level=2—

8.4 Joining Chunks

Text— cph=301— clh=215—

Chunks can be joined together to form a chain [how]. A chain of chunks swaps as though it was a single entity. Selecting any member of a chain also selects the whole chain in the first instance - tap in the margins again to limit the selection further.

Whether chunks are joined or not is saved with the document, but it has no effect on the visible document.

When joined, chunks show a chain link symbol on the right hand side instead of the doubled-headed swap arrow [illustration].

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- swapping chunks— level=2—

8.5 Swapping Chunks

Text— cph=128— clh=94—

You can quickly swap over 2 chunks by tapping the doubled-headed swap arrow on the right-hand side of that chunk in the editor [illustration]. If either of the chunks are part of a joined chain, the entire chain will be swapped over.

Text— cph=42— clh=42—

Swapping chunks doesn't dismiss the selection.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- splitting and merging chunks— level=2—

8.6 Splitting And Merging Chunks

Text— cph=111— clh=77—

The selected chunks can be split or merged based upon their text content. This allows prose to broken up, reorganised and adjusted, then rebuilt easily - and is a boon for anyone who finds positioning the cursor to be awkward.

Text— cph=197— clh=111—

Split is progressive. It analyses the text content in the selected chunks and splits them into more chunks holding the next lower level of textual grouping. For example, if one of the chunks includes several paragraphs it'll create chunks which each only hold a single paragraph, whereas if the all chunks hold single paragraphs, it'll split them into chunks each holding a single sentence. Split can split text down into individual words if required.

Text— cph=163— clh=94—

Split uses the text splitting rules specified by the document to split paragraphs into sentences and sentences into words. In addition to specifying what consistutes the end of a sentence and how to handle punctuation, the text splitting rules can also define certain phrases as being exempt from splitting - in order to save screen space.

Text— cph=163— clh=111—

Unlike split, merge is not progressive, but will generally rebuild paragraphs from whatever it is fed with. Merge does not alter the text within each chunk, but only connects them together sensibly. Merge respects broken lines in the first instance. If you apply merge again to a single chunk with broken lines however, it will merge the text into a single flowing paragraph.

Text— cph=94— clh=59— id=- merging chunks— prompt=Placeholder for link—

Merge uses the text splitting rules to understand how to handle punctuation within the text, and applies the specified sentence spacing between sentences.


Refered to in why can't I...

Text— cph=163— clh=94—

In addition to split and merge, you can also split a chunk manually at the cursor, using a typing reaction with a command of ‘Split Chunk’. The default typing reactions map this to 3 returns. Similarly you can manually merge chunks via typing reaction of ‘Merge Chunks’ - this mapped to 3 erases (i.e. ⌫⌫⌫ ) at the start of a chunk.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— level=1—

9 Document Settings

Text— cph=77— clh=59—

Each document has a number of settings which control its content and formatting, from how it is numbered to the appearance of section headings.

Text— cph=128— clh=94—

All document settings are saved invisibly within the document.

The specific settings available are covered in document settings.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- styles— join=Y— level=1—

10 Styles

Text— cph=128— clh=77—

Styles define the formatting of your document's content. They are ProseEdit's means of making text red, or bigger, or have a border etc. Every chunk is subject to one or more document styles. The styling of those styles is specified in the document's settings.

Text— cph=180— clh=111—

Styles are not visible during editing; they are applied when the document is saved. To see the document with its styles applied you need to preview it. This can be done from within the Editor [how] or in the File Manager [how].

Text— cph=215— clh=128—

The underlying technology is CSS style elements. ProseEdit embeds HTML tags into the document as part of creating it. The document styles then set the CSS style elements associated with those tags. Overall the style settings specify a list of style elements and their settings for each of the embedded tags. The style settings are saved as CSS in the document. This approach allows extensive control of the formatting, whilst being compatible with virtually every browser and Word®.

Text— cph=163— clh=111—

Although not essential, an understanding of how CSS works would be beneficial to the use of styles within ProseEdit and will help resolve some issues. The specification of CSS is available at www.w3.org/TR/CSS2. The specification's property listing gives quick summary of all the style elements and their available settings.

Text— cph=146— clh=94—

In CSS, every style specifies the setting for a number of style elements. Each style element specifies one aspect of the styling and has no effect on other aspects - so ‘color:red’ sets the text colour to be red, but doesn't alter the background. Incorrect style elements or settings are simply ignored without comment.

Text— cph=232— clh=146—

The syntax of CSS is not overly complicated, but there are a large number of style elements and each has their own range of acceptable settings. To ease their use ProseEdit provides Style Palettes which hold the elements and their common settings - to save you from having to remember or type them. By means of style palettes, setting a style is as simple as choosing the desired style and its value (or possibly typing it in). However, you always have the option of simply typing the raw CSS properties should you wish.

Text— cph=120— clh=82—

Styles are live - they are reapplied every time the document is saved. This means you can update the style and the change will be seen in all chunks which use that style (assuming they don't have their own override set).

Text— cph=82— clh=63—

You can copy and paste styling between chunks [how].

Section— cph=42— clh=42— level=2—

10.1 Default Styles

Text— cph=120— clh=82—

ProseEdit provides a number of default styles, whose styling can be set within document settings. These styles have been carefully chosen to provide a balance of capability and simplicity.

Text— cph=120— clh=82—

Default styles provide the means to alter the look and feel of your document in general - for example how section headings or lists appear. Essentially your document's content is poured into these pre-existing styles.

Text— cph=158— clh=101—

The default styles which apply to each type of chunk are covered separately under each type's description - see chunk types. The Document Setting documentation also has a complete listing of default styles [more].

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- user styles— level=2—

10.2 User Styles

Text— cph=215— clh=120—

Text chunks and item chunks can have a ‘user style’ set. If set, this is used instead of the chunk's normal default style. Note though that chunk's style will still be affected by styles set in higher levels - for example the overall list style for an item chunk. The user style takes priority over other styles though, except for style overrides. The style elements associated with each user style are set as a document setting.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- style override— level=2—

10.3 Style Overrides

Text— cph=139— clh=82—

Most chunks can have style overrides set, in their details. These are style settings which apply to just that particular chunk. They take priority over all over styles from any source (for example the style from the table cell a chunk is in etc).

Text— cph=82— clh=63— css=border:double cyan 3pt; background-color:teal; color:white; font-size:16pt; padding:3pt; margin-left:1in; margin-right:1in—

So if you have a sudden need for larger white text on a teal background with a fancy border, you can.

Text— cph=196— clh=120—

Style overrides are great for a specific styling tweak, but the styling is embedded into the chunk itself, so the only way to update the styling is to edit that chunk's details. If the same styling is to be used elsewhere, you'd probably be better off defining a user style and assigning the chunk to use it. That way future changes to the style will be reflected in all the chunks which use it.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- style hierarchy— level=2—

10.4 Style Hierarchy

Text— cph=82— clh=63—

Styles are hierarchical, with lower levels building upon, or possibly countermanding, the elements defined in higher levels.

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

For a text chunk the hierarchy is:

    Item— cph=44— clh=44— level=1— format=2—

  1. Document

  2. Item— cph=44— clh=44— level=1— format=12—

  3. Table styles, if the chunk is in a table

  4. Item— cph=44— clh=44— level=1— format=12—

  5. Chunk style, either:

    1. Item— cph=63— clh=44— level=2— format=5—

    2. Text / Title / Code - depending of the text chunk's type

    Item— cph=44— clh=44— level=1— format=8—

    or

      Item— cph=44— clh=44— level=2— format=12—

    1. User Style setting in the chunk, if set

    Item— cph=44— clh=44— level=1— format=12—

  6. Style overrides set in the chunk, if any

Text— cph=82— clh=63—

The chunk then takes the style elements which have been contributed by all the styles in the hierarchy.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- table styles— level=2—

10.5 Tables

Text— cph=101— clh=63—

The various table styles affect the cells of the table, and also the chunks contained within. The hierarchy within a table is more complicated with lots of overlaps.

    Item— cph=44— clh=44— level=1— format=2—

  1. Document

  2. Item— cph=44— clh=44— level=1— format=2—

  3. Table styling

    1. Item— cph=44— clh=44— level=2— format=5—

    2. Table overall default style

    3. Item— cph=44— clh=44— level=2— format=12—

    4. Style overrides for this table

    Item— cph=44— clh=44— level=1— format=12—

  4. Column styling

    1. Item— cph=44— clh=44— level=2— format=5—

    2. Columns default style

    3. Item— cph=63— clh=44— level=2— format=12—

    4. Column heading highlight - if applicable

    5. Item— cph=63— clh=44— level=2— format=12—

    6. Column style override for the column the cell is in

    Item— cph=44— clh=44— level=1— format=12—

  5. Row styling

    1. Item— cph=44— clh=44— level=2— format=12—

    2. Rows default style

    3. Item— cph=63— clh=44— level=2— format=12—

    4. Row heading or striping highlight, if applicable

    5. Item— cph=63— clh=44— level=2— format=12—

    6. Row style overrides for the row the cell is in

    Item— cph=44— clh=44— level=1— format=12—

  6. Cell style specified by the Column

    1. Item— cph=63— clh=44— level=2— format=12—

    2. In header column highlight, if applicable

    3. Item— cph=63— clh=44— level=2— format=12—

    4. Included Cells style override for the column the cell is in

    Item— cph=44— clh=44— level=1— format=12—

  7. Cell Styling

    1. Item— cph=44— clh=44— level=2— format=12—

    2. Cells default style

    3. Item— cph=63— clh=44— level=2— format=12—

    4. Cell style override for the containing cell

    Item— cph=63— clh=44— level=1— format=12—

  8. Styles associated with the included chunks themselves

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Section— cph=42— clh=42— level=3—

10.5.1 Borders

Text— cph=82— clh=63—

The borders of tables are also specified by styles, giving control over colour, line thickness and line style.

Text— cph=101— clh=63—

By default ProseEdit uses the ‘collapsed’ version of cell borders. This is more in-keeping with the style of tables normally expected in a document.

Text— cph=139— clh=101—

You can revert any table to HTML's normal separate box per cell model by specifying ‘border-collapse:separate’ as a style override for that table (or include it in the default overall table style to affect all tables). The difference between the 2 arrangements is illustrated below:

Table— cph=64— clh=64— style=257— series=Table— title=Normal Table—

TableColumn— cph=44— clh=44—

TableColumn— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

Table 10.1 Normal Table

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Cell with some text

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Cell with some text

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Cell with some text

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Cell with some text

TableEnd— cph=50— clh=50—

Table— cph=70— clh=64— css=border-collapse:separate— style=4— series=Table— title=Table With Separated Cells—

TableColumn— cph=44— clh=44—

TableColumn— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44— css=border:solid black 1px—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44— css=border:solid black 1px—

Table 10.2 Table With Separated Cells

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— css=border:solid black 1px— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=42— clh=42—

Cell with some text

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— css=border:solid black 1px— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Cell with some text

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— css=border:solid black 1px— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Cell with some text

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— css=border:solid black 1px— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44—

Cell with some text

TableEnd— cph=50— clh=50—

Text— cph=253— clh=158—

In the collapsed model, the borders between cells are shared, hence there will be a conflict if the 2 columns/rows/cells specify a different styling for their adjoining border. In general the conflict is resolved by taking the widest, or brightest border - though the exact outcome can be browser specific, so may vary. A CSS border style of ‘hidden’ always results in the border not being shown, regardless of the setting of the adjacent cell. Using the Default British Style Palette this would be achieved by setting a ‘Border Style’ to ‘Suppressed’.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- resources— level=1—

11 Resources

Text— cph=139— clh=82—

ProseEdit provides a number of editing facilities which you can configure to suit your needs. These are referred to as resources, and they are configured by resource documents which are loaded into the editor when the document is opened.

Text— cph=120— clh=82—

Which resource documents a document uses is a document setting [more]. The document can define specific resource documents to use for its resources, or take the App's default.

Text— cph=139— clh=101—

All the resource documents are ProseEdit documents which can be edited directly in ProseEdit. The resource documents are simple configuration files which are easy to amend to suit your requirements. There are no programming nor scripting languages involved.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- user edit menu— level=2—

11.1 User Edit Menu

Text— cph=158— clh=101—

The User Edit Menu defines what user buttons are included at the end of the Edit Menu [more]. The user buttons can provide a range functionality, from simple insertion of fixed text, to case switching and putting quotes or brackets around the selection, etc.

Text— cph=192— clh=111—

The document can specify a specific user edit menu to use, or take the current app default setting. This is set in the document's resource settings [more], which is accessed via〔Resources〕in the〔Settings〕menu.

Text— cph=63— clh=44—

You can alter the default user edit menu, or define new ones, for a particular purpose.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- user edit menu document— level=3—

11.1.1 User Edit Menu Documents

Text— cph=120— clh=82—

User Edit Menu documents define the user portion of the Edit Menu by means of a list of button chunks. When editing a User Edit Menu document, button chunks can be inserted just like any other chunk.

EditMenuButton— cph=50— clh=50— on=Y—

Button☐Text

ON

Text— cph=128— clh=77—

Each button chunk defines the text of that button. This text is inserted at the cursor when the button is tapped. In addition there is a grammar to define special operations - see the Edit Menu documentation.

Text— cph=111— clh=77—

The button definitions are loaded into the user portion of the Edit Menu in whatever order they occur in the document, but each button is only shown when it is applicable. Button chunks set to OFF, and all other types of chunks are ignored.

Text— cph=146— clh=94— join=Y—

The default user edit menu document defines buttons of general utility, and includes some other examples of what is possible. Feel free to edit it to suit your purposes [how].

Text— cph=128— clh=77—

To create a new user edit menu, either copy the default or use the ‘Resources/User Edit Menu’ template when creating a new document. All user edit menu documents must be in the ‘Resources / User Edit Menus’ folder to be available for use as a document resource.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- the lexicon— level=2—

11.2 The Lexicon

Text— cph=215— clh=139—

The role of the lexicon is to provide better suggestions for alternative words than a spell-checker can provide. The Lexicon contributes to the suggestions provided when the Edit Menu's spell-checking tick or cross is tapped. Lexicon suggestions occur first in the list of suggestion buttons. The Edit Menu shows a solid arrowhead to indicate when there are lexicon-based suggestions [illustration].

Text— cph=101— clh=63—

The key point is the Lexicon offers suggestions based upon what has been specifically defined within it, so its suggestions can be directly relevant to what you are writing.

Text— cph=158— clh=101—

When given 'there', the spell-checker will come up with ‘their’, ‘three’, ‘therm’, ‘theme’, ‘these’, ‘where’, ‘here’ and ‘thee’ - words which are closely related in terms of spelling. A lexicon entry however can provide ‘their’, ‘they're’, ‘they are’ and ‘they were’ or anything else which you are likely to want.

Text— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y—

Lexicon entries can provide:

    Item— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— level=1— format=12—

  • A means to augment the spellchecker

  • Item— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— level=1— format=12—

  • Synonyms

  • Item— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— level=1— format=12—

  • Homophones

  • Item— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— level=1— format=12—

  • Corrections

  • Item— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— level=1— format=12—

  • Negations

  • Item— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— level=1— format=12—

  • Changes of case

  • Item— cph=42— clh=42— level=1— format=12—

  • Or anything else which would be handy

Text— cph=59— clh=42— join=Y—

When compared to typing reactions, a lexicon entry:

    Item— cph=42— clh=42— join=Y— level=1— format=12—

  • Applies to text which already exists

  • Item— cph=42— clh=42— level=1— format=12—

  • Offers a choice of suggestions

Text— cph=59— clh=42—

When compared to a user edit menu button, a lexicon entry:

    Item— cph=59— clh=42— level=1— format=12—

  • Only appears when matching text is selected

  • Item— cph=59— clh=42— level=1— format=12—

  • Adjusts to match the case of the selected text

Text— cph=215— clh=128—

Each document specifies which lexicons to use (including the current app default setting at option) via its resource settings [more], which is accessed via〔Resources〕in the〔Settings〕menu. The document can specify several lexicons, so you can devise extensions as required. The lexicons are loaded in the order given. Later entries add to earlier ones, but are suggested first.

Text— cph=77— clh=59—

The document can also choose to include the current App default list of lexicons, or not - depending on what is appropriate.

Text— cph=146— clh=94—

You can alter the default lexicon to adjust it to your requirements, or make new lexicons which help with specialist terms. It's also easy to create custom lexicons, to provide specific support for specific documents. For example, you could create a lexicon of rhyming words as the starting point for crafting a poem.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- lexicon document— level=3—

11.2.1 Lexicon Document

Text— cph=111— clh=77—

Each lexicon document is a list of words and alternatives for them. It's much like a thesaurus except there is no requirement for the alternatives to have the same meaning - they just need to be good, convenient alternatives.

Text— cph=77— clh=59—

Within a lexicon document, any text chunk set to ‘code’ will be treated as offering definitions. Definitions are separated by a single return.

Text— cph=42— clh=42—

There are 3 types of lexicon definition:

Text— cph=40— clh=40— style=64—

word

    Item— cph=59— clh=42— level=1— format=8—

    Declares ‘word’ to be a word - so it'll pass the spell check

Text— cph=55— clh=40— style=64—

word, alternative1, alternative2, …


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06/03/2013 11:28 - Changed to text

    Item— cph=215— clh=163— level=1— format=8—

    Declares alternatives for ‘word’.

    Selecting ‘word’ in the text and tapping the tick will give all the listed alternatives in order. Additionally, ‘word’ and all the given alternatives are added to the spell-check dictionary.

    The entry is also cross-referenced so ‘word’ and ‘alternative2’ will be offered as suggestions for 'alternative1'.

Text— cph=55— clh=40— style=64—

word > correction1, correction2, …


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06/03/2013 11:28 - Changed to text

    Item— cph=284— clh=180— level=1— format=8—

    Declares corrections for ‘word’

    This is works just like alternative list above, but 'word' itself is considered to be incorrect. It is not added to the spell-check dictionary nor cross-referenced. Overall, ‘word’ will not be offered as a suggestion for any of its corrections.

    If you want ‘word’ not to be considered incorrect, simply include it in the list of corrections, or define it elsewhere (V1.2). This gives the option of setting up standing corrections for non-preferred words (like ‘nice’).

Text— cph=163— clh=94—

Note that ProseEdit's spelling check is separate to the iPhone's normal underlining of misspellings, which can be enabled from the App Settings [how]. ProseEdit's spellcheck is also fussier as befits its specific use with text documents (V1.2).

Text— cph=42— clh=42—

Lexicon entries are cross-referenced, so

Text— cph=40— clh=40— style=64—

Red, scarlet, crimson

Text— cph=146— clh=94—

also defines ‘red’ and ‘crimson’ as alternatives for ‘scarlet’, and ‘red’ and ‘scarlet’ to be alternatives to ‘crimson’. Suggestions generated via cross-referencing are listed after the stated alternatives. The corrections of a correcting entry are cross-referenced too, but the source word isn't. So an entry of

Text— cph=40— clh=40— style=64—

mispelt > misspelt, misspelled

Text— cph=59— clh=42—

will suggest ‘misspelled’ for ‘misspelt’, but not ‘mispelt’.

Text— cph=77— clh=59—

There's no requirement for lexicon entries to be synonyms. A lexicon entry simply provides alternatives for the given word. So while:

Text— cph=40— clh=40— style=64—

red, scarlet, crimson


(null)
06/03/2013 11:03 - Changed to text

Text— cph=59— clh=42—

gives handy synonyms for red (and crimson and scarlet),

Text— cph=40— clh=40— style=64—

there, their, they're, they are


(null)
06/03/2013 11:03 - Changed to text

Text— cph=77— clh=59—

means you can switch between these related words without having to position the cursor and type.

Text— cph=42— clh=42— join=Y—

Lexicon entries offer special handling of case:

    Item— cph=77— clh=59— join=Y— level=1— format=12—

  • ‘word’ will match ‘word’, ‘Word’ and ‘WORD’ in the text, but ‘Word’ will only match ‘Word’ (and not ‘word’).


  • (null)
    06/03/2013 15:16 - Changed to item

    Item— cph=111— clh=77— level=1— format=12—

  • If ‘word’ and ‘alternative’ are both in lower case, the alternative will be adjusted to match the case of the selected text, otherwise it will be suggested as it appears in the lexicon.

Text— cph=42— clh=42—

These rules allow an entry like

Text— cph=40— clh=40— style=64—

And > and, And

Text— cph=42— clh=42—

which is handy for titles

Text— cph=180— clh=111—

The default lexicon offers a small, but hopefully useful, range of entries concentrating likely 'changes of mind' and 'I need another word for'. It's worth a quick review to help you get the best out of the lexicon - knowing what it can suggest can save you a lot of typing. It also serves as an example of how to define lexicon entries to best effect.

Text— cph=146— clh=94—

A separate user lexicon document (Resources / Lexicons / User) lets you add your own definitions without having to face the default lexicon (V1.2). It is loaded last in the default set-up, so its definitions will be suggested first.

Text— cph=163— clh=94—

You can create a lexicon from any ProseEdit document; no special document is required. However, there is a template which also includes a reminder of the syntax - use the Resources/Lexicon template when creating a new document. All lexicon documents must be in the Resources / Lexicons folder to be available for use as a document resource.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- typing reactions— level=2—

11.3 Typing Reactions

Text— cph=249— clh=146—

The typing reaction resource specifies which typing reaction documents to load into the typing recogniser while editing this document. The document can specify several typing reaction resources. The document can also opt to use the App default typing reactions either alone or in combination with other specific resource documents. This is set in the document's resource settings [more], which is accessed via〔Resources〕in the〔Settings〕menu.

Text— cph=94— clh=59—

Each resource document defines a number of typing reactions which are loaded in the order given. Later reactions will override earlier ones with the same stimulus.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- typing reactions document— level=3—

11.3.1 Typing Reactions Document

Text— cph=128— clh=77—

A typing reactions document specifies a number of reactions for the editor's typing recogniser. Each reaction is defined by a reaction chunk. When editing a Typing Reactions document, reaction chunks can be inserted just like any other chunk.

TypingReaction— cph=60— clh=60— on=Y— anycase=Y— strict=N— wholeWord=Y— action=— copycase=Y—

stimulus

replacement text

WORDS

ANY CASE

AUTO CASE

Text— cph=94— clh=59—

The use of reaction chunks is covered in detail in the Editor's What You Can See And Do documentation.

Text— cph=59— clh=42— join=Y—

Reactions can be switched off, as below, in which case they are ignored.

TypingReaction— cph=60— clh=60— on=N— anycase=Y— strict=N— wholeWord=Y— action=— copycase=Y—

stimulus

OFF

replacement text

WORDS

ANY CASE

AUTO CASE

Text— cph=128— clh=94—

A reaction fires when its stimulus text matches the text to the left of the cursor after the character was typed (including text which was there before). The stimulus can be set to apply to any text or only complete words. The stimulus can also be set to be case insensitive or not.

Text— cph=77— clh=59—

Care should be exercised when defining (ANY TEXT) reactions, to avoid unintended triggering. A reaction of

TypingReaction— cph=60— clh=60— on=Y— anycase=Y— strict=N— wholeWord=N— action=— copycase=Y—

ont

not

ANY TEXT

ANY CASE

AUTO CASE

Text— cph=94— clh=77—

will correct ‘ont’ to ‘not’, but would also fire during the typing of contain, content, pontoon, and so on. Clearly in this case restricting the stimulus to (WORDS) would be appropriate.

Text— cph=249— clh=163—

When assessing stimuli, longer stimuli take priority over shorter ones. Also note reactions don't retrigger or chain, so defining a → b and b → c does not make a → c.

Stimuli can include spaces (shown as ☐) and returns (shown as ↵). The start of a chunk acts like a preceding ↵. Stimulii can also refer to the pressing of the delete key using ⌫ but this only applies to delete key presses at the very start of a chunk (and are normally used to trigger the merge chunk action). When editing a stimulus the keyboard includes extra keys for ↵ and ⌫.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— level=4—

11.3.1.1 Text Replacement

Text— cph=59— clh=59—

The normal behaviour of a reaction is to replace the stimulus text with the stated replacement text.

Text— cph=146— clh=94—

The replacement text can be set to be inserted as is (FIXED CASE), or adjusted to match the case of the triggering stimulus text (AUTO CASE). The latter will generally need to be combined with the stimulus being set to being case insensitive, so it can be triggered for a range of cases.

Text— cph=42— clh=42—

For example, a reaction of:

TypingReaction— cph=60— clh=60— on=Y— anycase=Y— strict=N— wholeWord=Y— action=— copycase=Y—

dont

don't

WORDS

ANY CASE

AUTO CASE

Text— cph=77— clh=59—

(noting the ANY CASE and AUTO CASE settings) will make ‘dont’ into ‘don't’, ‘Dont’ into ‘Don't’ and ‘DONT’ into ‘DON'T’.

Text— cph=77— clh=59— join=Y—

A ‘┃’ in the replacement text specifies where the cursor is to be left after the replacement. So a reaction of

TypingReaction— cph=60— clh=60— join=Y— on=Y— anycase=N— strict=N— wholeWord=N— action=— copycase=N—

(

(┃)

ANY TEXT

SAME CASE

FIXED CASE

Text— cph=111— clh=77—

will provide the matching closing bracket when ever ‘(’ is typed, and leave the cursor between the brackets to make it easy to enter the contained text. The ‘┃’ is available on the keyboard when editing the reaction text.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- date insertion— level=4—

11.3.1.2 Date Insertion

Text— cph=128— clh=94—

Instead of simply inserting the text, the reaction can be set to interpret it as a date format by choosing the ‘Insert Date’ action via the extended keyboard. ‘Insert Date’ works much like normal ‘Replace Text’, but will include the current date and/or time in the place of certain words:

    Item— cph=59— clh=42— level=1— format=12—

  • ‘date’ is replaced by the current date in a short format

  • Item— cph=59— clh=42— level=1— format=12—

  • ‘Date’ is replaced by the current date in a medium format

  • Item— cph=59— clh=42— level=1— format=12—

  • ‘DATE’ is replaced by the current date in a long format

  • Item— cph=59— clh=42— join=Y— level=1— format=12—

  • ‘yesterday’ is replaced by yesterday's date in a short format (V1.2)

  • Item— cph=59— clh=42— join=Y— level=1— format=12—

  • ‘Yesterday’ is replaced by yesterday's date in a medium format (V1.2)

  • Item— cph=59— clh=42— level=1— format=12—

  • ‘YESTERDAY’ is replaced by yesterday's date in a long format (V1.2)

  • Item— cph=59— clh=42— level=1— format=12—

  • ‘time’ is replaced by the current time in a short format

  • Item— cph=59— clh=42— level=1— format=12—

  • ‘Time’ is replaced by the current time in a medium format

  • Item— cph=59— clh=42— level=1— format=12—

  • ‘TIME’ is replaced by the current time in a long format

Text— cph=42— clh=42—

Other characters are included unchanged

Text— cph=42— clh=42—

You can still use ‘┃’ to position the cursor

Text— cph=128— clh=94—

If none of the keywords above match, the replacement text is interpreted with the current date and time using full Unicode date formatting [specification], giving complete freedom in formatting.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— level=4—

11.3.1.3 System Commands

Text— cph=180— clh=128—

Insert of inserting replacement text, a reaction can be set to perform a system command. The stimuli of system commands is treated as being strict - the stimulus has to be typed in one go with no corrections. The triggering stimulus text of a system command is removed from the document.

System commands include:

    Item— cph=111— clh=94— level=1— format=12—

  • Reactions Off
    Suppresses typing recognition for the editing of this chunk.

    Default stimulus: 'off

  • Item— cph=128— clh=111— level=1— format=12—

  • Reactions On
    Turns typing reactions back on again (this reaction remains active when reactions are turned off).

    Default stimulus: 'on

  • Item— cph=94— clh=94— level=1— format=12—

  • Split Chunk
    Splits the edited chunk at the cursor

    Default stimulus: ↵↵↵

  • Item— cph=111— clh=94— level=1— format=12—

  • Merge Chunks
    Merges the edited chunk with the one before

    Default stimulus: ⌫⌫⌫

  • Item— cph=146— clh=94— level=1— format=12—

  • Ignore
    Ignores occurrences of this stimulus. This allows a later typing reactions document to suppress a specific reaction included in an earlier reactions document (when the document specifies more than one resource).

  • Item— cph=94— clh=94— level=1— format=12—

  • Dismiss Keyboard
    Causes the keyboard to retract

    Default stimulus: qqq

Text— cph=59— clh=42—

The default stimuli are defined in the default typing reactions document.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— level=3—

11.3.2 Default Typing Reactions

Text— cph=232— clh=146—

The default typing reactions (Resources / Typing Reactions / Default) document provides an extensive set of reactions. These reactions can be edited to suit your preferences.

There is also a user typing reactions (Resources / Typing Reactions / User) document, to serve as an easy place to put your own general purpose reactions.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- additional typing reactions— level=3—

11.3.3 Additional Typing Reactions

Text— cph=146— clh=111—

A new typing reactions document can be created, either by copying the default, or using the Resources / Typing Reactions template.

The document must be saved to the Resources / Typing Reactions folder in order to be available as a resource.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- style palette— level=2—

11.4 Style Palette

Text— cph=94— clh=59—

The style palette determines how the styles in the document are displayed when they are being set and also what values are directly available.

Text— cph=94— clh=59—

In addition to saving typing, it also provides translation to and from raw CSS, so you can have more meaningful names for the style elements and their settings.

Text— cph=146— clh=94—

The document can specify a specific style palette to use, or take the current app default setting. This is set in the document's resource settings [more], which is accessed via〔Resources〕in the〔Settings〕menu.

Text— cph=77— clh=59—

The Style settings themselves are always saved as CSS within the document, so you can change the document's style palette at any time.

Text— cph=77— clh=59—

You can alter the default style palettes, or define new ones, for a particular purpose - for example to specify a set of company-standard colours.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- style palette documents— level=3—

11.4.1 Style Palette Documents

Text— cph=59— clh=42—

A style palette document is essentially a list of known style elements and their settings.

Text— cph=42— clh=42—

A typical style element entry might be:

Table— cph=64— clh=64— style=2— series=— title=Style element example—

TableColumn— cph=44— clh=44—

TableColumn— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

TableRow— cph=44— clh=44—

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=514—

Text— cph=45— clh=45— css=text-align:left— style=128—

1 Text Colour = color

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=215— clh=139— user-style=Button_Description—

Each top-level section chunk declares the existence of a style element and gives the raw CSS for it. When selecting a style element, the available elements will be listed in the order given.
Section chunks of level 2 work the same but prepend the current top-level section style name to it and indent during choosing lists.
Section chunks of lower levels are ignored, so can be used to arrange the settings.

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=63— clh=63— user-style=Button_Description—

Red = red
Cerise = #DE3163

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=120— clh=82— user-style=Button_Description—

Text chunks in the section list available settings for the current style element, one per line. Each one gives the raw CSS for that setting. When setting the style element these values will appear in order.

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=514—

Text— cph=44— clh=44— css=vertical-align:top— user-style=Button_Description—

+

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— style=2—

Text— cph=163— clh=106— user-style=Button_Description—

An entry of + indicates other settings are possible. This makes the style element show〔Type It〕when it is being set - so other values can be typed. If the setting listing doesn't include a +, the list of setting will be assumed to be closed - so you'll only be able to choose from the listed settings.

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44— user-style=Button_Description—

! comment text

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=63— clh=44— user-style=Button_Description—

Any line starting with ‘!’ will be included as a visible comment.

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44— user-style=Button_Description—

Orange = #xxxxxx | comment

TableCell— cph=44— clh=44— join=Y— style=2—

Text— cph=44— clh=44— user-style=Button_Description—

Text after a ‘|’ is ignored, and not displayed

TableEnd— cph=50— clh=50—

Text— cph=63— clh=44—

Two different style palettes are provided by default:

    Item— cph=120— clh=82— level=1— format=12—

  • Default British

    Provides a simple palette for the most common styling requirements.

  • Item— cph=196— clh=120— level=1— format=12—

  • Plain CSS

    Lists all the CSS style elements as they are, with no translation. This style palette is convenient if you are familiar with CSS - essentially it saves typing (and reminds you of the syntax).

Text— cph=177— clh=120—

Either of these files can be adjusted to suit your purposes. Alternatively a new style palette document can be created. You can create a style palette from any ProseEdit document; no special document is required. However, there is a template which also includes a reminder of the syntax - use the Resources/Style Palette template when creating a new document.

Text— cph=82— clh=63—

All style palette documents must be in the ‘Resources / Style Palettes’ folder to be available for use as a document resource.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- text splitting rules— level=1—

12 Text Splitting Rules

Text— cph=139— clh=101—

The text splitting rules determine how splitting and merging chunk text works. They also used for selecting sentences via the Edit Menu. Text splitting is never performed automatically - ProseEdit won't impose what it thinks is correct grammar behind your back.

Text— cph=187— clh=111—

The document can specify a specific text splitting rules document to use, or take the current app default setting. This is set in the document's resource settings [more], which is accessed via〔Resources〕in the〔Settings〕menu.

Text— cph=139— clh=82—

You can alter the default text splitting rules, or define new ones, for a particular purpose. While you can change the document's text splitting rules at any time, some caution is required, especially if the Sentence Spacing pattern is being changed.

Text— cph=177— clh=120—

Text splitting rules need to be compatible with typing reactions, to get consistent behaviour for typing new text and spliting/merging existing text. This is particularly true for sentence spacing. The default text splitting rules put in a double space after a sentence, and the default typing reactions includes reactions so typing the end of a sentence inserts 2 spaces after it.

Section— cph=42— clh=42— id=- text splitting rules document— level=2—

12.1 Text Splitting Rules Document

Text— cph=177— clh=101—

A Text Splitting Rules document uses pattern chunks to characterise punctuation into categories. When editing a text splitting rues document, pattern chunks can be inserted just like any other chunk. The sections have specific category titles, and pattern chunks within that section list the patterns which apply. Pattern chunks set to OFF are ignored.

Text— cph=63— clh=44—

There are 2 parts to a text splitting rules document:

    Item— cph=158— clh=101— level=1— format=12—

  • Paragraph Splitting Patterns

    Defines patterns which are used to split paragraphs into sentences, with categories like ‘Always Ends A Sentence’ and ‘Never Ends a Sentence’

  • Item— cph=158— clh=101— level=1— format=12—

  • Sentence Splitting Patterns

    Defines patterns used to split sentences into words. This is actually a more complicated task, with many categories required to handle punctuation sensibly.

Text— cph=234— clh=158—

The default text splitting rules document attempts to give sensible behaviour for British English. The document includes copious notes, so is probably the best reference for understanding how a text splitting rules document is put together.

The default rules also include options for different preferences, like a single space after a sentence - to guide likely tweaking.

Text— cph=158— clh=101—

To create a new text splitting rules document, either copy the default or use the ‘Resources / Text Splitting Rules’ template when creating a new document. All text splitting rules documents must be in the ‘Resources / Text Splitting Rules’ folder to be available for use as a document resource.

Text— cph=120— clh=82—

Changing the text splitting rules should not be untaken lightly. While the categorisations are relatively simple, the implications of combinations of settings can be distinctly unobvious.

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13 Coping With ‘Oops’

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We all make mistakes, from little ones to big ones. Fortunately ProseEdit is well-equipped with tools to help you recover the situation.

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13.1 Undo, Redo And History

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While editing text (keyboard up) the iPhone's usual shake to undo is available. This can undo all text edits, including typing reactions, but is limited to text changes made to the current chunk's text.

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The shake-to-undo is augmented by a complete document-wide edit history. All edits are logged, and can be undone and redone [how]. The edit history is also viewable, so you can browse back through your edits and undo all the edits back to a desired point, or extract lost content without having to undo your work since [more].

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The document undo and history is available via 〔/Undo\〕on page 3 of the toolbar.

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The document's history is a short term buffer. It is saved with the document. However, in order to keep the filesize small and have speedy opening times, it does not go all the way back to the creation of the document (and even if it did, it'd be rather unwieldy). It therefore shouldn't be relied on for long-term past version recovery. Instead ProseEdit provides Archiving tools for that purpose [more]. Taking an archive copy of document is the best way to keep it safe from future changes.

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13.2 Unintended Editing

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If you start editing the wrong file or forget to save an archive copy before making changes, the Done Menu has tools to help.

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You can:

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  • 〔Quit〕editing. This returns the document to what it was before you started this session of editing, including reverting any timed saves which have occurred in the interim.

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    Caution: if you have not saved the file elsewhere, or extracted content to Scratch etc, you will lose work. The document's history is reverted too.

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  • 〔Save A Copy〕separately to the file you are currently editing. This saves your document to a file with the same base name, but with a date-stamped comment.

    This is helpful if you realise you've been editing the wrong document, for it lets you save your latest work elsewhere, prior to quitting the current document, or undoing some of the changes or whatever.

    Of course another option might be to move stuff into Scratch.

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  • 〔Archive As Was〕to retrospectively create an archive copy [more] of the document as it was before you started editing it - i.e. when you opened it in the editor. This is handy if you forgot to grab an archive copy prior to starting to change things.

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  • 〔Archive As Now〕to create an archive copy [more] of the document as it is now. This provides a quick way to keep a version of the document safe before amending it - and is a good habit to get into.

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14 Warnings And Errors

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Any problems noted when the document is opened are shown as an alert and are also saved to Warnings within the Info document setting [more].

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Certain chunks can generate warnings too. For example a table cell chunk will complain if it doesn't have any content chunks within it. These warnings can be viewed in the chunk's details [more].

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Chunks with warnings are highlighted in magenta. This highlight is only visible during editing. The output is unaffected.

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If the editor crashes, the details are recorded in the file ‘Resources / Crashes.txt’. This file is attached if you report a crash [how].

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This is a ProseEdit Help File. You can edit as desired to add notes. If you delete the file, it will be replaced the next time ProseEdit starts up.